nh2.jpg
nh13.jpg
header6.jpg
header7.jpg

Artist Profile

Ndinisa

Roy Ndinisa

b. 1954 Swaziland

Roy Ndinisa’s creates woodblocks which are flat compositions using symbols, highly stylized figures, and decorative patterns.His two major themes include his concern for the preservation of tribal, traditional life and his fear that assimilation is taking place in the urbanized African living a Westernised lifestyle in the townships.

Roy Ndinisa began drawing to pass the time as he took care of his younger brother and sister in his hometown of Mamelozi, Swaziland. As a young man, he joined an arts organization in Pretoria called PAMBA, which taught its members an appreciation for art, music and dance. It was here that Ndinisa met artist Walter Battiss – so instrumental in inspiring artists of his generation – and attended classes given by him.

Ndinisa also has a love for music, which he acquired from his parents. He played the drums while his mother an Ndebele sangoma consulted with her patients. Ndinisa has been learning the piano and hopes to study music further. He has worked in the Lighting Department at Sun City and behind the scenes with PACT’s Opera section. He is also involved in teaching art.

Ndinisa carves his woodblocks from masonite, and before painting the woodcut in brilliant, Ndebele influenced colours, he pulls woodcuts from the block in black and white. His works on paper carry political messages, depicting imprisonment and other aspects of the struggle for democracy

Roy Ndinisa

Roy Ndinisa was born in 1954 in Swaziland.
As a young man, Ndinisa joined PAMBA an arts organization in Pretoria which taught its members an appreciation of art, music and dance. It was here that Ndinisa met artist Walter Battiss and attended classes given by him. Ndinisa played the drums while his mother, an Ndebele sangoma, consulted with her patients and he has a love for music. He has worked in the Lighting Department at Sun City and behind the scenes with Pact’s Opera section. He is involved in teaching art to others.

His works on paper carry political messages, depicting imprisonment and other aspects of the struggle for democracy. In 1993 his detailed watercolour and pen and ink portrait, entitled The Black President, expressed his hopes that Mandela would be elected. This work is on view on the Mandela @ 90 exhibition.
Ndinisa also carves woodblocks from masonite, and before painting the block in brilliant primary colours, he pulls woodcut prints in black and white .His woodcuts are created with highly stylized figures, and decorative patterns.
His two major themes include his concern for the preservation of tribal, traditional life and his fear that assimilation is taking place in the urbanized African living a Westernised lifestyle in the townships.

FIRST SOLO EXHIBITION;
1994: Tradition and Township, Natalie Knight Gallery [Johannesburg]

GROUP EXHIBITIONS:
1981: Arcadia Centre [Pretoria]
1985: Le Bulletin de l’Alliance Francaise
Tributaries sponsored by BMW JHB then toured Germany, FUBA Gallery [Johannesburg]
1989: Natalie Knight Gallery [Johannesburg]
1994: Windows on the New South Africa, World Trade Centre, KGI [Toronto]
1996: Tomorrow is Now, Knight Galleries International [Toronto, Vancouver]
Roy was the Guest artist at the exhibition and was sponsored by SAA.
1997: Images of Freedom [Arts and Events Gallery, Toronto] Opened by Mr. Patrick Evans South African Consul-General
1997/98: Ndebele Images – Then & Now 1976 – 1998, National Arts Club in N.Y.
2005 Formed Group called Tshwaraganang African Giants Arts and crafts cc and exhibited at Union buildings Pretoria and Bus Factory, JHB
2006 Exhibited at Centurion Art Gallery
2008 Soul of Africa- Development Bank of SA, Pretoria

1954: born in Swaziland

1954: moved to Mamelodi [Pretoria]

TRAINING AND EDUCATION:

Self-taught since the age of 9

FIRST SOLO EXHIBITION;

1994: Tradition and Township, Natalie Knight Gallery [Johannesburg]

GROUP EXHIBITIONS:

1981: Arcadia Centre [Pretoria]

1985: Le Bulletin de l’Alliance Francaise
Tributaries, FUBA Gallery [Johannesburg]

1989: Natalie Knight Gallery [Johannesburg]

1994: Windows on the New South Africa, World Trade Centre, KGI [Toronto]

1996: Tomorrow is Now, Knight Galleries International [Toronto, Vancouver]

1997: Images of Freedom [Arts and Events Gallery, Toronto] Opened by Mr. Patrick Evans South African Consul-General

1997/98: Ndebele Images – Then & Now 1976 – 1998, National Arts Club in N.Y. (incl. Paintings by Esther Mahlangu)